21 days with a tricycle and tent

On August 26, 2011, Glen Aldridge (Trident trike), Gary Bunting (Catrike), and Steve Greene (ICE trike) set out from the central Oregon coast on human powered recumbent tadpole tricycles, bound for the southern Mojave Desert of California, a distance of 980 miles. The journey required 21 days to complete. Not all proceeded as originally planned. There was a major revision in the route, and not all the members of the team arrived at the final destination. View 928 photographs on this website that document what occurred, day by day. Click on any day, either in the sidebar to your left, or at the top menu of this page to see the images and read a brief summary of that particular day. CCTE video clips appear below the Synopsis of Days, along with a few interesting facts. To read a more detailed summary of what happened each day in its entirety, click the “DAILY SUMMARY” link to the left. View standard and Satellite maps of the entire trek by clicking on the CCTE MAPS link. To read the comprehensive account of this trek in greater detail, written by all three trikers, you may acquire a copy of The Overland Triker book, which also describes how to successfully plan and execute an overland trike journey such as this one.

The TRIKE GYPSIES:  Steve GreeneGary BuntingGlen Aldridge

Nearing the end of the trek, US 395 provides many hours of sweet solitude.

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SYNOPSIS OF DAYS:

Glen, Gary, & Steve: 

Day 1: Florence, Oregon to Scottsburg – 38 miles

Day 2: Scottsburg to Elkton – 19 miles

Gary & Steve: 

Day 3: Elkton to Tyee Campground – 14 miles

Day 4: Tyee to Glide – 36 miles

Day 5: Glide to Susan Creek Campground – 12 miles

Day 6: Susan Creek to Boulder Flat Campground – 24 miles

Day 7: Boulder Flat to Diamond Lake Lodge – 27 miles

Day 8: Diamond Lake Lodge to Broken Arrow Campground – 6 miles

Day 9: Broken Arrow to Mazama Campground, Crater Lake – 28 miles

Day 10: Mazama to Rocky Point Lodge – 40 miles

Day 11: Rocky Point Lodge to Klamath Falls – 30 miles

Steve:

Day 12: Klamath Falls to Canby City Park, California – 86 miles

Day 13: Canby to 38 miles north of Susanville – 52 miles

Day 14: north of Susanville to 30 miles east of Susanville – 68 miles

Day 15: east of Susanville to Reno, Nevada – 65 miles

Day 16: Reno to Topaz Lake – 63 miles

Day 17: Topaz Lake to Bridgeport, California – 44 miles

Day 18: Bridgeport to McGee Campground (near Crowley Lake) – 60 miles

Day 19: McGee to Lone Pine – 90 miles

Day 20: Lone Pine to Kramer’s Junction – 122 miles

Day 21: Kramer’s Junction to Apple Valley (destination) – 52 miles

Interesting Information:

Flat Tires: Glen – 3 in two days (57 miles); Gary – zero in 11 days (278 miles); Steve – zero in 21 days (980 miles)

Negative/dangerous motor vehicle interactions during CCTE: Zero

Dog aggression incidents during CCTE: Zero 

Money spent by Steve during 21 day journey: $789

Pounds lost by Steve during the 21 days: 15

Fewer miles than original itinerary through northwestern Nevada: 72

Stink bugs dodged on roadway shoulder during three weeks: 9

Close calls with thieves and hoodlums: Zero

Total number of water offload breaks: Uncountable

Number of “thumbs up” and friendly interactions with motorists: 497

Dollars spent on gasoline to travel 980 miles in 21 days: Zero

Toxic poisons emitted by vehicles en route: None

Number of times chain lubed: 2 (at beginning & half way)

Number of times tires checked for air pressure: 3 (beginning, end of week 1, end of week 2)

Was journey a significant physical and mental challenge: Yes!

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AND THEN THERE WAS ONE:

Pedaling the final feet into mom’s driveway in Apple Valley, California, I am glad to have made the trek … although mighty tired when this photograph was taken. I had hoped that Glen and Gary would have been here too, but alas, the trike gods didn’t smile upon them.

Owens Valley of eastern California – US Highway 395 with its ultra wide shoulders

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3 thoughts on “21 days with a tricycle and tent

  1. Thanks Tim. That photo on 395 was south of Ridgecrest, California, and in the distance, you can see the top of Red Mountain, at the base of which sits the old mining town of the same name. – Steve

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